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Behavioural support

Search or browse using tags to find information and resources about Behavioural support as part of the FAB approach (Food, Activity, and Behavioural Support).

Search or browse using tags to find information and resources about Behavioural support as part of the FAB approach (Food, Activity, and Behavioural Support).

FAB behaviour

Behavioural support involves reinforcing changes in lifestyle, particularly in diet and physical activity, and developing positive habits. Families, whānau, and especially spouses, should be encouraged to support the new behaviours aimed at weight loss.

Below are some suggestions of the behavioural strategies you can talk about with your patients, or for more information on behavioural-support-based interventions, use the tabs above to view news, articles, initiatives, discussion and more on this topic.

Self-monitoring

Ask your patient to keep a record of their food intake and physical activity. This can help them identify patterns in their habits and help them make any necessary adjustments.

Stimulus control

Stimulus control can help your patient limit their exposure to high-risk situations where over-eating or unhealthy eating may occur. Here are some of the things your patient can do to help control their eating habits.

  • Read nutrition information panels on foods and choose healthier options.
  • Remove unhealthy foods from the house to avoid temptation.
  • Consciously avoid situations in which overeating occurs.
  • Have regular mealtimes and snack times.

Stress management

Stress can trigger poor eating patterns. Helping your patient manage their stress through meditation or relaxation techniques may help prevent overeating.

Problem-solving

Encourage your patient to identify problem areas related to eating or physical activity then help them identify possible solutions. Helping your patient to choose a healthier alternative increases the chance that they will continue with the new behaviour pattern.

Contingency management

Encourage patients to reward themselves when they achieve a weight loss goal (e.g. losing a certain amount of weight, or spending a certain amount of time doing a physical activity). Rewards can be great motivators and can encourage your patient to continue with their weight management programme.

Cognitive restructuring

Negative thoughts and feelings can undermine your patient’s weight loss efforts. Help them to understand that perfection is not required in order to succeed with their new healthy lifestyle, and that one small slip-up isn’t the end of the world.

Encouraging your patient to maintain a positive attitude even when things go wrong may lead them to stick with their weight management programme in the long-term.

Social support

Social groups can help maintain motivation and provide positive reinforcement. Encourage your patient to ask whānau/families, friends, and community groups for support.