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Food

Search or browse using tags to find information and resources about Food interventions as part of the FAB approach (Food, Activity, and Behavioural Support).

Search or browse using tags to find information and resources about Food interventions as part of the FAB approach (Food, Activity, and Behavioural Support).

FAB food

Offering nutritional advice is an integral part of the FAB model.

Here are some suggestions that you can discuss with your patients, or for more information on food-based interventions, use the tabs above to view news, articles, initiatives, discussion and more on this topic.

Portion sizes

Portion control is an important weight loss tool, as it is easy to underestimate how many calories you are consuming each day.

  • A portion is about the size of a person’s cupped hand.
  • Try to eat smaller portion sizes, especially of foods that contain a lot of fat and sugar.
  • Eating off a smaller plate can help to control portion size, while still making you feel you’ve got plenty of food.

Food types

Making some simple food changes can help you start your weight-loss journey.

  • Carbohydrate-rich foods such as wholegrain bread or brown rice are high in fibre, which helps fill you up.
  • Margarine is lower in fat than butter and is also lower in calories.
  • Fruit and vegetables are filling and nutritious. Aim to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables each day.
  • Save calories by removing the skin from chicken and trimming the fat from meat.
  • Grilling and baking are healthier cooking options than frying.
  • If you do fry foods, choose mono- and polyunsaturated oils for cooking.
  • Snack foods such as such as potato chips, sweets and biscuits as an occasional treat.
  • Takeaways and fast food should only be eaten as an occasional treat.
  • Drinking water instead of sugary drinks can help stop hunger cravings and reduce your overall sugar intake

Eating habits

  • When discussing dietary changes with your patient, make sure you take into account their lived realities.
  • Remember that food can have social significance, so understanding your patient’s cultural conventions may also help you to understand their eating habits.
  • It is important that your patient feels comfortable with the changes they are about to make, so you should encourage them to choose one or more new dietary habits which they feel are achievable.